Question: Does Chemo Affect Your Muscles?

How long after chemo does your body get back to normal?

Most people say it takes 6 to 12 months after they finish chemotherapy before they truly feel like themselves again..

Can chemo affect your walking?

Chemotherapy medications travel throughout the body, where they can damage the nerves. An Ohio State University study on people diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer found that just one cycle of chemotherapy can affect walking gait and balance, putting people at a higher risk for falls.

Do you ever recover from chemo?

If you were treated with certain types of chemotherapy, you can also have many of the same problems. Some problems go away after treatment. Others last a long time, while some may never go away. Some problems may develop months or years after your treatment has ended.

What should I avoid after chemotherapy?

Foods to avoid (especially for patients during and after chemo):Hot, spicy foods (i.e. hot pepper, curry, Cajun spice mix).High fiber foods (i.e. raw fruit and vegetables, coarse whole grains).Fatty, greasy, or fried foods.Rich desserts.Nuts, seeds, or dried fruit.

What does chemo do to muscles?

Oxidative stress, mediated by cancer or chemotherapeutic agents, is an underlying mechanism of the drug-induced toxicity. Nontargeted tissues, such as striated muscle, are severely affected by oxidative stress during chemotherapy, leading to toxicity and dysfunction.

Can chemo cause weakness in legs?

Some chemotherapy drugs can damage the nerves that send signals between the central nervous system and the arms and legs. This is called peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms include tingling (“pins and needles”), numbness or pain in your hands and feet, and muscle weakness in your legs.

How long does muscle fatigue last after chemo?

CRF usually lasts from 3-4 weeks after treatment stops but can continue for up to 2-3 months.

How can I rebuild my immune system after chemo?

8 Ways to Care for Your Immune System During ChemoAsk about protective drugs. … Get the flu shot every year. … Eat a nutritious diet. … Wash your hands regularly. … Limit contact with people who are sick. … Avoid touching animal waste. … Report signs of infection immediately. … Ask about specific activities.

Does chemotherapy affect your thinking?

Chemo brain is a common term used by cancer survivors to describe thinking and memory problems that can occur during and after cancer treatment. Chemo brain can also be called chemo fog, cancer-related cognitive impairment or cognitive dysfunction.

Does Chemo get worse with each cycle?

The effects of chemo are cumulative. They get worse with each cycle. My doctors warned me: Each infusion will get harder. Each cycle, expect to feel weaker.

Does chemo permanently damage immune system?

After chemotherapy, immune system recovery may be slower than believed. Most cancer patients know that chemotherapy weakens their immune systems, putting them at risk for viral and bacterial infections. A month or two after chemo ends, however, most people assume their immune system has returned to normal.

Does Chemo shorten your life?

Cancer survivors tend to have shorter telomeres than normal persons at the same age. This means that they are older than their actual years. It could be the intensive and toxic chemotherapy and radiation therapy that has led to this finding say researchers.

What damage does chemotherapy do to the body?

Chemotherapy can cause fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, bowel issues such as constipation or diarrhoea, hair loss, mouth sores, skin and nail problems. You may have trouble concentrating or remembering things. There can also be nerve and muscle effects and hearing changes.

Does chemo affect balance?

Some chemotherapy treatments can affect your balance and cause neuropathy. Neuropathy, which can make your feet numb, is a common side effect of chemotherapy. If you cannot feel your feet, it becomes difficult to maintain good balance.

Does chemo cause muscle weakness?

Certain types of chemotherapy affect the small sensory nerves in the feet and hands, causing symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and pain in fingers and toes. Treatment with chemotherapy can also result in weakness, muscle cramps, and muscle fatigue.